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11 Banned Foods Americans Should Stop Eating

This is bad news about the food we eat. The way I get around it and avoid these nasty ingredients is to get my organic from Farm Fresh to You (Affiliate code: LIND8318) and I get my protein sources (fish, scallops, chicken, beef, pork) from ButcherBox (http://fbuy.me/pVa4f). These are sources I've checked out and trust. I've been using their service for years and am convinced of the high quality that they provide.

Below are some of the most commonly used food ingredients and practices that are allowed in the United States, but banned elsewhere. Banned Ingredients #1 — Dough Conditioners Dough conditioners, such as potassium bromate and azodicarbonamide are chemicals used to improve the strength and texture of bread dough. Dough conditioners are often found in white breads, rolls, and “egg breads.” They are possible human carcinogens and exposure to them is known to cause respiratory sensitivity, such as asthma or other breathing difficulty. Potassium bromate is banned in China, India, Brazil, the European Union, and Canada. And azodicarbonamide is banned in Australia and Europe. Banned Ingredients #2 — Brominated Vegetable Oil Brominated vegetable oil (BVO) was originally patented by chemical companies as a flame retardant. Now, BVO can be found in certain colorful sports drinks and citrus-flavored sodas as an emulsifier. Accumulates in human tissue, as well as breast milk, and can cause memory loss over time. Bromine toxicity can lead to skin rashes, appetite loss, and heart problems, as well as major organ damage and birth defects. BVO has been banned in Japan. Banned Ingredients #3 — Propylparaben In the United States, propylparaben is used as a preservative in tortillas, muffins, trail mix, pies, sausage rolls, and more. Research has found that it can affect sex hormones and sperm counts and may be linked to breast cancer. Propylparaben is legal in the U.S., but in 2006 the European Food Safety Authority banned the use of propylparaben. Banned Ingredients #4 — BHA and BHT BHA and BHT are popular man-made antioxidants used in dry mixes, cereals, and dehydrated potato products to preserve them and increase shelf life. These are possible carcinogens and endocrine disruptors — meaning that they can alter the normal function of your hormones and lead to disease. BHA and BHT are banned for use in food and beverages by the United Kingdom, European Union, Japan, and other countries. Banned Ingredients #5 — Synthetic Food Dyes Food manufacturers use synthetic food dyes, such as blue 2, yellow 5, and red 40, to enhance the coloring of certain foods and ingredients to make them more appealing to consumers. Some foods that contain food dyes include beverages (like juices, sports drinks, and sodas), candy, and glazes used in baked goods and sweets. They’re even used in silly things like making mustard more yellow, salmon more pink, and jarred pickles the perfect shade of yellow-green. And don’t even get me started on maraschino cherries! Research has linked consumption of synthetic dyes to an increased risk for numerous conditions, like tumors and hyperactivity in children. Synthetic food dyes are banned in Europe and Australia, where more natural coloring compounds are used. For example, in most of the world, Fanta contains actual fruit juice and is dyed naturally. Banned Ingredients #6 — Genetically modified organisms GMOs Soy, sugar beets, corn, canola, cotton, and alfalfa are GMO crops.One of the most common herbicides used in conjunction with these GMOs is glyphosate, the primary active ingredient in the weedkiller Roundup. Glyphosate consumption is linked to cancer. There are bans or major restrictions on use of glyphosate in Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Czech Republic, Denmark, El Salvador, France, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, New Zealand, Portugal, Scotland, Slovenia, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, and the United Kingdom. Banned Ingredients #7 — Roxarsone The arsenic-based drug roxarsone, was routinely used in chicken in the U.S. until July 2011, when Pfizer decided to stop selling it. However, there is no actual ban on the use of arsenic in the raising of chickens for food. Roxarsone was used to increase the pink coloring of raw chicken meat, to speed the growth of the birds before slaughter, and to prevent parasites in the chicken’s stomach. Research shows chronic exposure to arsenic can lead to anemia, skin lesions, kidney damage. It can also increase the risk for certain cancers, miscarriage, and birth defects. The European Union banned the use of arsenic-based drugs, while many chicken products in the U.S. still contain it. Banned Ingredients #8 — Ractopamine In the U.S., ractopamine is a muscle enhancer for pigs, cows, and turkeys. And, like other harmful substances used during the raising of animals, it doesn’t just go away when the animal is slaughtered. Some of it is still left in the meat you buy. Ractopamine is banned in 122 countries including Russia, mainland China, Taiwan, and many countries across Europe. This is because it’s been linked to reproductive and cardiovascular damage in humans, as well as chromosomal and behavioral changes. Banned Ingredients #9 — Herbicides, Insecticides, Fungicides Herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides are widely used on crops in the U.S. food system to keep them free of bugs and diseases. Meanwhile, other countries see (and act on) the danger they pose to humans. Of the 374 active ingredients authorized for agricultural use in the U.S. in 2016, the European Union banned 72 of them. Wow. Banned Ingredients #10 — Olestra Olestra, or Olean, is a cholesterol-free fat substitute created by Procter & Gamble and is used in certain potato chips and french fries. Olestra may cause extremely unpleasant digestive reactions, like diarrhea and leaky bowels. Consuming a lot of it can also lead to deficiencies in fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E, K, as well as carotenoids. Both Canada and the United Kingdom have banned the ingredient. Banned Ingredients #11 — Synthetic Hormones Synthetic hormones, such as rBGH and rBST, are widely used in the U.S. dairy industry. The primary reason for this is to increase milk production in dairy cows. However, rBGH increases IGF-1(Insulin-like growth factors) levels in humans and may increase the risk of developing cancer. Additionally, cows treated with rBGH are more likely to develop mastitis, an udder infection, requiring treatment with antibiotics. Canada, the EU, and other countries have banned these compounds.

Information provided by Food Revolution Network


FUN FACT: Human bones account for about 14% of the body's total weight.

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